German 1

jbartolomeo

Course Description:

In this beginning German course, students are introduced to basic communication and comprehension skills in German. Assuming no prior knowledge of the German language, the course introduces the fundamentals of German grammar, vocabulary, and conversation. It also coordinates the study of language with culture through the use of video, audio, and mass-media production. Students who complete the course successfully will begin to develop a functional competency in the four primary language areas (speaking, reading, listening, and writing), while also establishing a solid grammatical base and a firm understanding of German culture. Guided translation exercises at the end of each module, based on various passages and versions of the German Bible, help students solidify their understanding, develop translation skills, and explore the context and meaning of select biblical passages.

The second semester of German 1 expands on the knowledge gained from the first semester and further develops skills in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. To accomplish this goal, various instructional activities are employed throughout, including oral practice (via Voice Tools), homework assignments, games, songs, videos, quizzes, tests, projects, and other activities such as writing wikis and journal entries. Various cultures of the German-speaking world are explored through readings, videos, and other activities as well. Finally, as with semester 1, guided translation exercises at the end of each module, based on various passages and versions of the German Bible, help students solidify their understanding, develop translation skills, and explore the context and meaning of select biblical passages.

Approved by:
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA®)

Recommended Prerequisites:
None

Course Types Available:

  • 1 Credit – Full course (1 credit, 12 weeks minimum / 12 months maximum)
  • ½ Credit – 1st semester only (0.5 credits, 6 weeks minimum / 6 months maximum)
  • ½ Credit – 2nd semester only (0.5 credits, 6 weeks minimum / 6 months maximum)

Biblical Integration Information:

  • Creation: When God created Adam and Eve, he blessed them with a common language, perfect harmony, and an adventurous mandate—to “be fruitful and increase and fill the earth” (Genesis 1:28).
  • Fall: As a result of the Fall, however, that harmony began to unravel. Humans became more and more violent and increasingly rebellious against God (Genesis 4:3–15, 23; 6:5, 11–12). Even after the Flood, in direct refusal of God’s command to fill the earth, our primeval ancestors banded together at Babel, built themselves a city, and began constructing a tower reaching to the heavens—undoubtedly an attempt to invade God’s abode and usurp his rule (Genesis 11:1–4). Yet, recognizing their intentions, the Lord confused the people’s language and dispersed them throughout the world in an ironic act of judgment (vv. 8–9).
  • Redemption: Thankfully, the judgment of Babel is not the final word about human language and culture. The Bible itself envisions something of a reversal of Babel, when God “will purify the lips of the peoples, that all of them may call on the name of the Lord and serve him shoulder to shoulder” (Zephaniah 3:9; cf. Isaiah 66:18; Daniel 7:14; Zechariah 8:23). While such a reversal is yet to come (see Revelation 7:9–10), we can still work toward such unity by learning other languages for kingdom purposes. Learning German, for instance, not only allows us to express sacrificial love for and humility toward German speakers (cf. Matthew 22:34–40; Philippians 2:1–11); it also allows us to more directly proclaim the gospel and help make disciples among them (cf. Matthew 28:18–20; Acts 1:7–8). A further benefit of learning a language like German is that the learning process itself can help form self-control, diligence, and other biblical virtues in students (cf. Galatians 5:22–23; 2 Peter 1:5–7).

Required Purchased Materials:
Speakers and microphone